Field grown trees

Trees grown in the open ground develop thick trunks and aged characteristics quicker than pot grown trees. We have been field growing trees specifically for bonsai for over 20 years and have refined our techniques to produce better trees for your bonsai passion.

Our field grown trees are dug regularly and root pruned to promote the best possible nebari and tachiagari for your future bonsai. Trees are pruned regularly while in the growing beds to create a trunk with movement and great taper.

 

 

Field grown trees are available in a range of sizes from 15 cm pots through to larger trees in polystyrene boxes. Also available bare rooted during winter. Species generally available include: Trident maple, Japanese maple, Japanese Black pine, Chinese Quince, Shimpaku juniper, Chinese and Seiju elm.

30 cm orchid pots. Trunk diameter 5-7 cm, height 30-70 cm.

Similar sized trees also potted in 25 cm plastic pots.

Species include Chinese and Seiju elm, Trident maple, Shimpaku juniper, Chinese quince, Japanese Black pine.

 

 

Larger field grown pre bonsai in polystyrene boxes. Trunk diameters up to 15 cm, height 50 – 70 cm. Species include Trident maple, Japanese maple, Black pine.

 

 Have a look at the current catalogues via the links on the catalogue page –http://shibuibonsai.com.au/catalogue/

New catalogues are usually posted in late October or November when the new trees have settled in to the pots.

7 thoughts on “Field grown trees

    • Hi Darren,
      The catalogues have been updated recently to show what stock is still available.
      I normally dig new trees from the growing beds in July then give them a few months to re-establish roots in the pots and regain health before offering them for sale so new stock will appear in the catalogues somewhere around late October or November. Please note that as a result of the very dry summer here my trees have not developed as quickly as usual this year and there will probably be far fewer new trees for sale this spring. Still plenty of smaller and immature ‘starters’ though and I am planning to have shibui bonsai stock on the sales tables at the Bonsai North West Show July 26 and 27 at Footscray Community arts centre.

  1. Hi Niel, what is the address in Footscray where you have your plants for sales? And when? I want to buy a few for my garden. Thanks.
    Bao

    • Hi Bao, We sometimes make the trip down for the Bonsai North West exhibition which is held in Footscray but I am not sure when it will be held this year. The other place where I take plants for sale is the Bonsai Society of Victoria exhibition which is usually held in early October and has been at the Box Hill town hall for the past few years. Whether we get down to either of these shows will depend on what else is going on in my life and what stock I have for sale.

  2. Hi Neil,

    You mentioned above that you dig up field stock in July and then re-pot. Do you typically remove the tap root at this point or wait till the late winter prune? I have a few young (1-2 yr old) bare rooted ornamentals grown from seed which I have potted, but was unsure whether to remove the tap root at this point.

    Thanks,

    Mark

    • I prune roots and top all at the same time Mark. It dies not matter which roots – any that are too long or grow the wrong direction get cut off. You can shorten any long down roots whenever you have the roots out of the ground. That reminds me that I should put up a post showing how much I cut off these trident maples.
      Neil

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